Spotlight on Community: Sheridan Station

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Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang

Sheridan Station is the redevelopment of a failed public housing development in the Anacostia neighborhood of the District of Columbia. A challenging topographic site and ineffective storm water management resulted in flooding and significant erosion of the site, hence the public housing units were vacated and demolished. After several attempts at redevelopment failed, and with a new comprehensive plan in place, the DC Department of Housing and the development team secured a U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grant to redevelop the site.

Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang
Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang

Sheridan Station is the first multifamily development in the DC to be awarded the LEED Platinum designation and contains the largest privately-owned solar photovoltaic system in the city. At 100 kilowatts, the system produces 100,000 kilowatt hours of electricity per year and offsets up to 40 percent of the annual electric costs for the building’s common areas. All structures have energy star lighting and appliances, low flow plumbing fixtures, high efficiency HVAC systems and windows, and low VOC paint.

Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang
Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang

The development has a highly sophisticated storm water management system comprised of hydrodynamic separators, bio-retention areas, X-filtration areas, permeable pavers, and underground rain cistern and a green roof/rain garden terrace. The Low Impact Development measures implemented mitigate storm water issues and protect the Anacostia River.

Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang
Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang

Sheridan Station offers low income, workforce, and market rate housing; with both rental and ownership opportunities. Each housing type is indistinguishable from the others and the design creates a walkable streetscape providing direct access to multiple modes of public transportation. The project was 100% pre-leased and fully sold. The location along the Suitland Parkway is a central visual aspect of the gateway to the nation’s capital. For a decade the site contained vacant, boarded up buildings, overgrown vegetation, and trash strewn hillsides. What was then a reminder of the worst of the city’s times is now a vibrant community.

Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang
Photographer: Maxwell Mackenzie and Max Zhang

 

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